Volume : VII, Issue : V, May - 2018

Does Homocysteine level affect the severity of coronary artery disease and the outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting - a prospective study

Dr. Arun Kumar Haridas, Dr. Bharathi Shridhar Bhat

Abstract :

 INTRODUCTION

Plasma Homocysteine is a known risk factor of Coronary artery disease (CAD).There are not many studies that correlate Homocysteine level with CAD and its effect on patients who are undergone coronary artery bypass (CABG) in Indian population or western population.

AIM

The aim of our study is to analyse the correlation of plasma Homocysteine levels in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with respect to various patient variables like age, sex and also the severity of disease and outcome of surgery.

METHODS

The plasma Homocysteine levels of one hundred patients undergoing CABG, between January 2016 and January 2017 were analysed. Data about patient variables was obtained from questionnaires given to the patients during the preoperative period. The severity of disease was assessed based on Coronary angiogram (CAG) findings and perioperative findings. Homocysteine levels were assessed by CLIA method and levels of greater than 13mmol/L was taken as hyperhomocyteinemia.

RESULTS

Higher Homocysteine levels are associated with triple vessel disease (TVD) with greater severity of disease. It is also associated with poorer target vessels with increased morbidity and post operative mortality.

CONCLUSION

Homocysteine level is one of the independent risk factor for severity of CAD.

It can have predictive value in CABG but modifiable if preoperatively treated.

Article: Download PDF    DOI : https://www.doi.org/10.36106/paripex  

Cite This Article:

Dr. Arun Kumar Haridas, Dr.Bharathi Shridhar Bhat, Does Homocysteine level affect the severity of coronary artery disease and the outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting‾a prospective study, PARIPEX‾INDIAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH : Volume-7 | Issue-5 | May-2018


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